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Love

This Room And Love After Love Comparison

Imtiaz Dharker’s ‘This Room’ is written to create an impression of seeking ‘freedom’, where her room is ‘breaking out’ and seeking ‘space, light and empty air’. In this poem dharker describes the room as going wild, with everything in it trying to escape to ‘freedom’. On the other hand, Derek Walcott’s poem of ‘Love After Love’ is telling us how to love our selves after ending a relationship or better how to love yourself before loving another. Walcott uses words such as elation and smile to show that his poem is all about learning, accepting and celebrating who you are.
Dharker personifies the bed as ‘lifting out of its nightmares’. This shows that all negativity is being left behind, as chairs move out their usual ‘dark corners’. Alliteration and metaphors are also used to create an image and convey a sense of freedom as the chairs ‘crash through clouds’. In love after love, Walcott shows that learning to love yourself will not come immediately, but ‘the time will come’. He emphasizes that there is joy involved, as he says that it will be with ‘elation’ as you ‘greet yourself’ as you look at yourself in the mirror. The first stanza ends with the idea that you will smile at your self.
Dharker’s stanza three of ‘this room’ goes on to carry the theme of celebration of the fact that life can be unpredictable. A description of the sounds and movements of the kitchen equipment that ‘bang together in celebration, clang’ and eventually ‘fly’ past the fan, they look to be following the chairs and bed upwards. The onomatopoeia also enhances the sound effects of the poem. In love after love, Walcott says ‘again the stranger who was yourself’, conveys the idea that the person you use to be is like a stranger now. Walcott also uses religious diction, where he uses short imperative sentences, ‘give wine, give bread’. The religious words give a formal and caring tone to the poem.

In ‘This Room’, ‘no one is looking for the door’ at the end of stanza three; this could either mean no one wants to leave this place because there is now a sense of celebration there or it could mean that, no one wants to use the easy way out, they want to have the feeling of expanding and growing, moving skywards and forward in life. ‘Love after love’ is a poem that represents the internal thoughts of the writer. Walcott uses the phrase ‘peel your own images from the mirror’; here Walcott emphasizes that you’re past, ‘all your life, whom you ignored’ has value and helps for you to realise the importance of being comfortable and happy with who you are, accepting who you are.
In ‘This Room’, the 1st person is not used until the fourth stanza, ‘I’m wondering where I’ve left my feet’. Again emphasizing the point that that the atmosphere was exciting. The structure of the poem is not straightforward it is written in free verse although; Dharker uses enjambment to connect the fourth and fifth stanza witch is one line which emphasizes the ‘space’ and ‘freedom’. ‘My hands are outside clapping’, once again the writer emphasizes the idea of celebration.
In love after love, Walcott uses enjambment to link one stanza with the next. In the third stanza he uses the imperative ‘take down the love letters from the book shelf’; the idea leads into the last stanza that continues with the ‘photographs, the desperate notes’ which you should also take down. ‘Peel your own images from the mirror’ and ‘Feast on your life’. Instead of reminding your self of your previous relationships and pictures of previous partners, Walcott wants us to look at our own life and appreciate who we are.
In conclusion both poems have similar themes. The celebration of personal growth and expansion, accepting and being comfortable with who you are, are the key themes of the poems. Freedom is the most important thing and we should make the most of it in our lives. Both poems stress that the past should be left behind for example ‘lifting out of its nightmares’ and ‘take down the love letters from the book shelf’. ‘This Room’ is a metaphor for life’ and ‘Love After Love’ is about appreciating life. We should grow and think forwards.

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Love

Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love

IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE Set in front of the conservative backdrop of 1960’s Hong Kong, Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love tells the intimate tale of two people who, by fate, seem to land themselves in each other’s company due to the common bond of the absence of their spouses. The plot of the film is by no means anything original, but it is deeply accentuated by the style in which the film is shot. With unconventional camera angles, an inconsistent musical score, and deep, luscious colors, In the Mood for Love brings a seemingly real perspective to a very personal story. Mr.
Chow (Tony Leung) and Mrs. Chang (Maggie Cheung) coincidentally, move in to their small neighboring Hong Kong flats on the same day. Mr. Chow, a newspaper editor with an unseen, but presumably traveling, wife, and Mrs. Chang, a secretary, also with an unseen business executive husband. The two often find their paths crossing as they frequent the same streets, restaurants, and noodle shop. It is when they discover that their spouses are having an affair that they begin to see each other. Unlike very fast paced, show-all, American films, the relationship that blossoms between Mr.
Chow and Mrs. Chang is not one of immense passion and love, but more of a deeper unsaid understanding. It is the simple gestures such as the conversations, the gazing into one another’s eyes, and the holding of hands where the real relationship lies. This could not be clearer when, in a climactic moment of the film, they briefly caress each other’s hands in the back of a taxi. The film is accentuated by the unconventional, but highly innovative camera work throughout. Often times the camera remains stationary while the characters move about, and sometimes out of the frame.

It’s as if to remind the audience that we are looking through a peep hole rather than through a movie screen, and that there are things that we will not be able to see. Throughout various portions of the film, like the rice cooker scene, for example, you can hear the characters speaking, but you will actually have to visualize what they are doing. The position at which the camera lies throughout the movie is also noteworthy because of the strange angles it is put at, such as under a bed, over a person’s shoulder, through metal grating, and in general, low to the ground.
It seems that Wong Kar Wai is telling us “no, that’s too easy. You need to look at this from a more difficult position, as if you were eavesdropping on these very private moments…” The rich colors and costumes of the film play a very large part in how the story is told as well. In the first scene, at the appearance of Mrs. Chan and her very colorful dress, the audience is immediately drawn to her and continues to watch her throughout the rest of the film. From then on each dress, one right after the other, begins to astonish the viewer with its lush colors and interesting patterns.
This immediately sets Mrs. Chan apart from any other character, especially Mr. Chow, who dresses in relatively the same attire every day, creating a very physical contrast between two characters who are emotionally similar. Not only does the costuming add emphasis to the film, but the lighting of most of the scenes adds another layer onto they already thick stylized coat of the film. Much of the film takes place on the very foreign and almost enigmatic streets of Hong Kong, usually during the night, and we are provided with not quite enough illumination to see everything perfectly.
This adds a heightened level of mystery throughout the entire film, especially in the first half, before the characters really meet. The warm colors, in a sense, add quite a bit to the slow pacing of the film. These are not very cold, vivid, or fast colors, but rather ones that let the scenes take their time, in a place where conversations are not hurried and friendly games with neighbors last into the late hours of the night. The editing also does its part to slow down the movie, making the shifts between days seamless and slowing scenes down into slow motion to literally “juice” the magic out of them.
However, much, if not all of the aforementioned material is simply technique none of the true bread and butter of movies is covered. This is simply because there hardly was any. Is the plot original? No, not really. Is the script solid? Well, considering there was no actual script to begin with, no. But is the way in which all of these, otherwise boring, elements filmed beautiful and interesting? Absolutely! It seems that the true core of this movie is missing, but who’s to say that every movie has to follow a standard formula? THEMES TIME
After reading some interviews I found that Kar-wai was very interested in the past, almost nostalgic for how Hong Kong was when he was growing up. He also finds interesting ways to show the passing of time in In the Mood for Love with the many beautiful dresses that Mrs. Chang wears. ISOLATION Another heavy theme in In the Mood for Love is isolation. In a couple of the interviews Kar-wai mentioned that people (like himself) fleeing Shanghai to Hong Kong basically had to cram into apartments. Kar-wai creates a limited visual space by having actors off-camera, shooting in narrow hallways.
Even the character’s emotions seem to distance themselves. CINEMATOGRAPHY The way Wong Kar-wai and Chris Boyle go about shooting movies is the complete opposite from every other director we’ve studied this semester. Instead of taking a more professional approach of meticulously planning out every shot, they figure out what would be best determined by location, and it seems they act more like bumbling film students rather than award winning filmmakers. “Our styles come from the way we work; like in Fallen Angels we started working in a very small teahouse, and the only way we could shoot the scene was with a wide-angle lens.
But I thought the wide-angle lens was too normal, so instead I preferred an extreme wide-angle. And the effect is stunning because it draws the characters very close to the camera but twists the perspective of the space so they seem far away. It became a contrast to Chungking Express, in which people are very far away from the camera but seem so close. Also, we work with very limited budgets and we don’t have permits, so we have to work like CNN, you know, just breaking into some place and taking some shots.
We often don’t have time for setups, and sometimes when neighbors walk into the frames we have to cut them out, and that becomes a jump cut. I think 10 or 15 percent is preconceived. Most of it just happens. ” –Wong Kar-wai This is all very surprising because the most notable features in In the Mood for Love is the look of the film, which is beautiful. It’s nice to know there are other ways to go about shooting a film, and that being meticulous doesn’t make you a better director. The way you take on the challenges of shooting a film to be as visually competent as possible makes you a director.
WORKING WITH ACTORS Seeing how Kar-wai’s filming techniques are by the seat of your pants, it comes as no surprise that his directing of actors is just as spontaneous. During the filming of In the Mood for Love, Maggie Cheung said that the camera would be far away (because he’s shooting with a wide angle I’d assume) and that he would all of a sudden want to switch the shot to slow motion, without telling any of the actors. “He will see a shot and then suddenly he will picture it as a slow motion shot and he’ll just say, let’s try one of those, and then he’ll just do it, without us even knowing. I’m not sure if this is the best way to go about directing an actor unless you are absolutely sure about what you’re doing. Wong Kar-wai seems to be a free spirit in the way he speaks, and directs. Plus he has a close relationship with many collaborators so everyone knows what is needed from them to complete his vision. Kar-wai seems to know the most about human emotions and how to properly show them on the screen so they’re believable. I remember there was an emotional scene where I was saying good-bye to Andy Lau at a bus stop.
We had to retake that scene the next day because I was not very good. I thought I had been good because I had been crying and crying, but Wong Kar Wai said, “It is not about that. It is not about how many tears drop out of your eyes or how emotional you are. ” I said, “No? But you ask me to cry and I am crying, why am I doing it wrong? ” He said, “But when you cry you should try to hold back. Nobody cries just like that. The minute you feel the sting in your eyes your first reaction should be ‘I don’t want to cry,’ and to hold it back. ” INFLUENCES
Wong Kar-wai was born in Shanghai and moved to Hong Kong when he was five. Leaving his 40 or so cousins, he became an only child thanks to the Cultural Revolution. Leaving the lifestyle of a small village full of friends and family your own age, to a city full of adults must have been very impressionable on the young Kar-wai. His mother loved movies and luckily for them there were plenty of theaters around playing Western, European, and local films, “we spent almost every day in the cinemas because she doesn’t have any friends or relatives in Hong Kong”.
Days of Being Wild, In the Mood for Love, and 2046 all take place during the 1960’s in Hong Kong, with slight political undertones so this place and time was obviously very important to him. Wong Kar-wai also seems to be heavily influenced by the French New Wave, but who isn’t? Like The 400 Blows and Breathless, Kar-wai’s films come off as a love letter to their settings because of how beautifully detailed the shots are. You can tell that he is in love with Hong Kong and that it is his greatest influence.

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Love

Lookin for love

The first personal ad I f und on craigslist had to do with the equity theory “Country guy looking for a good woman (PAIWV) First off I want to be straight up I’m not looking to rush into anything serious. That’s what I would like eventually but only with the right one. With that said a little about me I’m a young looking 30yo white, no kids, 6′ with fit/slender build. I’m a mountain boy thru and thru but not your typical one. I don’t listen to country, chew tobacco, drive a truck etc. But I do like my guns collecting/shooting, bein in the woods or on the lake, rock climbing, on and on.
I also like working in my shop, my cars, woodworking etc. I’m educated so I can hold my own talking about pretty much any topic. Also have a descent Job, nice house in the mountain and financially responsible. I dont want to ramble so I’ll save it for getting to know each other. What I’m looking for is a mature honest woman that has her stuff together. Drama free, no crazy ex boyfriends or anything like that. Anywhere between 21-35, must be fit/inshape and take care of yourself. Just a descent woman that has a good head on her shoulders and looking for the same.
If interested drop e a line anytime(l). ” The equity theory is the idea that people are the happiest with relationships in which the rewards and costs experienced and the contributions made by both parties are roughly equal (pg. 300). This ad reflects this theory because the man who wrote this clearly states that he is looking for an equal partner. He wishes for her to be independent not have to rely on him to support her financially. If a women had written this ad then things might have been written differently.

A women would emphasize his needing to be financially independent but ould also put more of an emphasis on how he looks, where he lives and what type of Job does he have. The second personal ad has more to do with the social exchange theory. “I am a white man, 6ft, 185, very clean, d;d free. I am searching for a white lady that has sexual relationships with black men but would like to have a white man that would support ; spoil her. I would never Judge her, she would be treated like a queen. Age and size is not a factor. Please get in touch, I am very real, it suppose to me very nice this week.
I would like to hear from you and we can exchange pics and chat and possibly meet. Please put queen of spades in subject when responding. (2)” The social exchange theory is the idea that people’s feelings about a relationship depends on their perceptions of the rewards and costs of the relationship, the kind of relationship they deserve and their chances for having a better relationship with someone else (pg. 299). This ad reflects this theory because the man is offering to not only support her financial but promises to spoil her if she meets his equirements.
If a women were to be writing an ad like this she would be more subtle in her writing, for one should would not come out and admit her past relationship experiences but she may try to allude to it. However if she was actively looking for someone to take care of her financially she would most likely openly state that in her ad. Sex differences in attraction exist but each individual person is looking for something different. What attracts you to one person may be a complete turn off to someone else. lookin for love.

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Love

How many of you love cats and would like one?

I hope this speech will help you become sane and understand the craftiness in a feline. But for those who already own one I am sorry but all hope has been lost.
I am here to talk to you about a club that I am truly committed to. It is called CHOW. I doubt many of you have ever heard of it but it stands for Cat. Haters. Of. The. World.
Cats are the most selfish, evil eyed, greedy, filthy things in the world.

What do you think cats are sitting around lazing around for? They are coming up with ideas on how to trick the owner and steal food if not how to kill Barack Obama and become the first evil eyed monster to become the president and who would be the first lady.
They are cunning creatures who think they own the world. Well let me tell you now; they don’t. Have you ever endured the aggravation that is given by a cat when it imitates what you do? Well I have done so many times seeing as there are about sixteen cats in the awful household next door no wait the parasites have also invaded my doorstep and under my dad’s car, my garage and my roof.
I mean these killers have left their fresh kill under our porch doormat to stop it being taken away by my old neighbour. The squeaking and the squishy, mushy feeling that is created on every step taken by myself isn’t pleasant seeing as two weeks later my sister had revealed the horrors of the dark side that lay beneath our door mat. It will never be normal again. Having seen all that sticky oozy blood I can never step foot on that step ever again.
Surely an old man of about ninety years old should be caring for his own health than his devil cats. Has he not discovered the real truth behind these supposedly “cute babies”. Approximately seventy percent of the Earth sees the reality behind the black fur and the huge eye sockets with coloured eyes.
Some may say I have missed the fact that they do not harm, yet have you realised that they are in fact associated with witches. In fact there is a black cat who tries to pounce at me every time I try to throw a bag at it. As you may or not know I throw like a chicken so I don’t really understand what the cat tries to do but I can tell you that it is not normal. Don’t worry I have checked to make sure that no one is watching.
It does not help that I am allergic to them but their really big eyes scare me. Once upon a time in a house in a town called Wembley, I watching TV and eating chips when an overweight obscure tomcat came and sat on the same scarlet coloured sofa as me. I had not realised until my sister had went into the dining room screaming.

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Love

The Love Suicides

In The Love Suicides, Ritter by Classmate Anemones and considered to be a masterpiece, many complications arise In this romantic and dramatic tragedy that demonstrates a most complex look at love. In this essay, I will delve Into the symbolism of the work, the significances of the characters’ actions, the cultural differences from those that I am accustomed, and my viewpoint of the fatal ending. The Love Suicides is set in a Snakeskin, Japan tea house in 1720 and is a great favorite of the Japanese stage.
It tells the calamitous story of Jessie, a paper merchant and his lover, Koura, a prostitute. This story Is about the moral and social code ender which the townsmen lived at the time, with the status of merchants being lower than that of the samurai class. Even though considered to be a lower class, the townsmen had developed a firm ethical code whereby in order for your business to prosper, your financial and personal obligations had to be met first. Jessie is married to his cousin, San, and is tormented by his sense of duty to his family and tormented by his love for Koura.
The story opens with Koura secretly meeting a “samurai customer,” while dodging Ethel. A wealthy man who Is attempting to buy her contract and take her as his own. Koura does not like Tahiti and wants no part of him. In trying to understand Tahiti, I can only imagine that he feels. Tahiti is a rich guy who loves this woman but she in love with another man who happens to be married and the father of two children. The “samurai customer” walks in wearing a wicker hat concealing his face.

The samurai Is actually Jewel’s brother, Magneto, a flour merchant, who has come Into the tea house to meet Koura. However, Ethel believes him to be Jell, whom he despises and begins to speak negatively about him attempting to defame him and ruin his reputation in the eyes of Koura. Tahiti continues to rant about Sissies occupation as a paper merchant, putting him down incessantly. The “samurai waited patiently for his turn with Koura, and finally Tahiti left, but left her depressed and In deep thought about her love, Jill.
This only makes the “samurai” even angrier because after being very irritated at all of the commotion Ethel had made, he soul Is not getting any service as a guest of the establishment. The “samurai” is getting angry with Koura for neglecting him, and she begins to tell him that she’s been afraid of dying ever since Jessie asked her to omit a love suicide. Unbeknownst to Koura,Jessie is outside eavesdropping, having gone to visit her after hearing that she was meeting a samurai costumer. Jessie has been with Koura for almost two years and everyone knows it.
He begins to wonder If the two years had been a lie. Jell Is so Infuriated at this point that he tries house. In an effort to defend Koura, the “samurai” grabs hold of the Sissies hand through the latticework and ties him up. Tahiti returns and sees Jessie tied up outside the window and seizes his opportunity to beat him up, while calling him a thief trying to rob the place. The samurai comes to Sissies defense and starts assaulting Tahiti, causing him to run away. It was then that the samurai revealed himself to be Sissies brother.
Magneto begins to pour his heart out to his brother, telling him how his affair with Koura has Just about destroyed his family and tarnished his own reputation. Jessie understands and tells his brother that he is ending his relationship with Koura, wanting to destroy all of the love letters that were exchanged between himself and Koura. Magneto takes all of them and finds a note from San, Sissies wife, addressed to Koura. What are the limits of love? In this story so far, boundaries have been pushed and emotions have run high. Sissies brother is clearly there out of love for his family and for his brother.
When the reputation of your family and your own is at risk then this is the point where a serious decision has to be made on what your future actions will be. San actually starts to feel sorry for Koura and the situation the she is in, loving a married man (her husband) and has a contract on her by someone who she doesn’t love. San wants Jessie to go and save Koura from committing suicide. She wants him to pay the ransom to get her out of the contract. Jessie tells San that the price is very high so San gets half of the money and tells Jessie to pawn all of the family fine garments to make up the other half.
These family garments are the nicest and most valuable items at the time to own. These are thick silk and patterned clothing that have been passed down through the generations. Why does San care that much about a woman that is sleeping with her husband? These are the cultural difference that have made this one of the best stories and is still in books today. When Son’s father, Agamemnon hears that San was willing to ell the family garments to save her husband’s mistress, he forbids it and demands that Jessie divorces his daughter and takes San away.
In the meantime Magneto is running around looking everywhere for his brother. Jessie hides from Magneto, watching and listening sadly to his brother’s anguish and pain. Jessie sneaks back to the tea house and gets Koura and they take off to Maxima, knowing that their lives would end soon and decide that they will die at the Adagio Temple, the perfect place for their love suicide. Jessie and Shark’s decision to kill themselves is quite stubbing to me. The thought of committing suicide in the western word is extremely taboo.
In many eastern societies, it is considered an honorable way to die. I believe suicide to be a cowardly act. Jessie isn’t thinking about his wife or his children, only himself. Jessie tells Koura that he has divorced San, but still out of respect for her they will not to die together, saving San the shame of how it will look. At dawn, the fateful couple prepare for death. Jessie stabs and kills Koura with a knife and then hangs himself by Jumping off a sluice gate with a noose around his neck. They die in the belief that they would share the next life together in happiness.
A teaching of Buddha is that those who commit suicide for love will be together in the next life to come. As for me, this is a story of impulsiveness, heightened emotions, and human frailties. Jessie was torn between two opposing worlds, one of duty and the It is true that love is a most powerful emotion and can make some people commit some of the most irrational, unfathomable, illogical, incomprehensible, hopeless, desperate and deadly acts imaginable. In the case of Jessie and Koura, they did it for love.

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Love

All we need is love

All we need is love Love is a very deep feeling that goes with us in our life. Without love there is no true life and no meaning of life. From the moment we are born we are surrounded with love of our parents and other relatives and we love them back. First we love our mother – the first person we see in our life. You may say that in our babyhood it is an unconscious feeling, it is an instinct, but nevertheless it is true innocent love and affection. As we start sense the world we start feel love to father and other close people.
We take and give this love s self-evident and can’t even imagine our life without these people. Growing older we experience first love to somebody in kindergarten or at school. It is always pretty to kick at the little children attracted to each other. And it is a wonderful moment to realize that you are in love for the first time. In childhood and also in our adult life we also love our pets – cats, dogs, goldfish, tortoises etc. Our pets can always make us kind and happy. Have never understood people who don’t love animals, and I am sure that every child should have a puppy or a kitten.
Besides, care of domestic animals helps to bring up a conscious, responsible, attentive person. In our mature love we may love some persons, and we are very lucky if there is somebody who loves us back. Sure there can’t always be mutual love, and we can’t make somebody to love us as we do. But when we feel it, the world seems wonderful. Without a doubt love makes us stronger, happier, and more motivated. We get desire to become better for the person we are in love with, and to make good deeds. Love inspires everybody. Many poets, writers, artists, composers devoted heir works to beloved persons.

If there was no love in our life there will be no outstanding works of art known all over the world. Sure it is a hard job to love someone, in spite of his/her imperfections, and the marriage build on love is the strongest. A person who does not love cannot be happy. He is usually grumpy, nervous, and strict. He cannot understand those who are experience this feeling. Feel sorry to such people because love is the most beautiful thing that can happen. I wish everyone to feel it, and I hope you and your close people love each other, and this love Will last forever.

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Love

What Love is for Shakespeare

Like every other poet, mainly characterized by idealism and creativity, William Shakespeare views love as an eternal and ideal state of being. People often look at its grim features. But Shakespeare chose to distinguish love from pain, as what it naturally is. This essay will try to discuss love as seen by Shakespeare and written in his 66th sonnet. Shakespeare wrote the sonnet by citing important influences on love – time and place, beliefs, church and politics, life and death, change, and permanence.
He admits that there are impediments because of these factors, but he refuses to give in and be stopped by them. He said, “Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments. ” These impediments for him are considered to be fixable, as he said in Much Ado (MA. II. 2. 1-4. ). Shakespeare disagrees on the kind of love that is easily broken or vanished. He thinks that it is permanent and doesn’t yield to heavy toil and suffering.
He said, “Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove:” This is actually common to everyone, particularly those who are new to such intense feeling and have not yet experienced the pain of their first love. However, Shakespeare thinks of love as an unyielding and enduring connectedness. He then compared it to a beacon used by sailors in shipping, unshakeable even by great waves and storms. “O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark, That looks on tempests and is never shaken. ”

Love guides every wandering soul like the northern star guides every sailor. He wrote, “It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken. ” Also, love is not a plaything or a toy easily broken by ageing. “Love is not Time’s fool,” proves that love is not based on physicalities that rots as Time dictates. Love endures even Time and doesn’t change in distance served. The fleeting time is measured by weeks and hours but these don’t matter really for a love that endures change.
Death may end everything and given that we don’t believe in continued life after death, reincarnation perhaps, love will bring people to their end, still holding each other tight, even with their hands cracked by age. He said, “Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. ” However love may seem perfect and eternal to Shakespeare, he still realizes that everything has an end. This is explained by a seemingly underscored concluding couplet of the sonnet. Love will always be a part of life that is temporary.
Nonetheless, he has already made his claim and established his points on the wondrous feeling brought by love to the extent that he seeks challenges from other people and willingly sacrifices the validity of all his sonnets, the melting pot of his romanticism, when this treatise on love is proven wrong. This sonnet has been read widely, like all of his other works, and became the basis for those who seek answers on the question of what love really is. It is never wrong to be idealistic, especially on issues as fulfilling as this. However, we must always accept that everything has its end.
Since everyone who feels such love is going to die anyway. Still, Shakespeare is one of those who aims high and gives this very particular topic the right for eternity and endurance. Love is never a simple thing, it is wide and complicated. It digs in people’s hearts and reveals what they truly are, without much consideration of what others might say or what time has kept ahead for him. It is worthy of the best imaginations, best literatures, and best descriptions no matter how painful it is at times, the happiest point of loving is always far eternal than that of other source of happiness.

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Love

Lorca’s play on tragic love

Lorca’s play on tragic love, The House of Bernarda Alba, is his last complete play. It is interpreted as a metaphor of repression with its theme focused on frustration, honour and death. The play contains both the passion and the torment in the intense struggle of a group of women held in check even from the thought of love by a tyrannical mother, Bernarda. The play investigates and provides a response, but not a solution, to the problems of oppression, transgression, sexuality and being a victim. Bernarda’s strict rule is as powerful as the wilful nature of the youngest woman who betrays the family.

Her ability to satisfy her sexual desire symbolically shatters the order of extreme repression and absolute control. Her rebellion and death mark the reasons and effects of the repressed atmosphere. Ultimate protest, despair, and madness emphasize the even more extreme control, unhealthy fear, mindlessness, and especially silence that befall the women who remain in the house. However more scrutinizing approach to the issue of victim in the play reveals that not only Bernarda’s daughters appear as victims but Bernarda herself being a victimizer is a victim.

Bernarda Alba is the mother, a dramatic personality, whose words carry the authority of the supreme ruler and whose life shows little emotion. In this austerity she rules her household, never sparing from her wrath anyone who attempts to revoke the stifling atmosphere she has superimposed on herself and her daughters. As a result, all – Bernarda, the daughters, the servants – exist in darkness and depression ultimately leading to sterility of emotions and finally to suicide.
Bernarda is a selfish and tyrannical matron who eventually forces her daughters into the despair. They lose every vestige of hope; this loss leads directly to the moral death of each daughter and to the physical death of the youngest. Slowly, but unequivocally, Bernarda drains the minds and hearts of her daughters until they become as white and barren as the walls of their physical prison the metaphor of which is conveyed by the visual nature of the house with its thick walls and a few windows and doors leading to the outside world.
However, this significant visual image exceeds its literal meaning and, above all, represents a sociocultural institution keeping all the main characters of the play in subordination to social dogmas and rules. Within the confines of its walls Bernarda and her family repeat the old traditions, like many generations of women that preceded them. This repetitive and collective act obliterates the uniqueness of the individual for the sake of preserving patriarchal hegemony.
When reading The House of Bernarda Alba it becomes obvious that the play’s most powerful strength is in its dialogues, while the characters are limited in their movement and space within a closed location. By dint of auditory means, Lorca reaches the explication of the contrast between girls and their mother. This contrast is emphasized by the other devices like contras of black and white, and these two colours are highlighted throughout the play: the black dresses of the women in mourning, in contrast to the very white walls of the house.
Moreover, Bernarda’s authoritarian voice stands out as she commands, “Silence! ” [p. 161] at the opening, throughout, and end of the play, closely related in each case to the death of one member of the family and the spiritual death of those living. Despite Bernarda’s call for silence, other sounds succeed in penetrating the thick walls and contribute to define the nature of their society and the dichotomy between life inside and outside the house. Bernarda’s house is a household without men. This is by fate as well as by author’s intention to establish controversial circumstances.
Upon the death of her husband, she must assume the patriarchal role of protecting her daughters’ honour and forbids the presence of men within the confines of the house, thus limiting the world her daughters are allowed to know. Her house is clearly governed by patriarchal forces. Pepe el Romano, the male character we do not see but hear about, is the strongest motivating force in the play. Bernarda’s authoritarian discourse stubbornly reproduces what she learned from her father and her grandfather.
This concept associates property with social class, as Bernarda is well aware. When one of her daughters has the opportunity of marrying, she does not allow it: “BERNARDA, loudly. – I’d do it a thousand times over! My blood won’t mingle with the Humanas’ while I live! His father was a shepherd. ” (p. 191). The situation within the walls of her house would have been quite different had Bernarda found enough men of her social condition to marry her daughters. Lorca indicts society, and the reader might be inclined to condemn Bernarda as well.
Although she is not aware of it, Bernarda is a victim turned victimizer. In the same way that her daughter, Adela, is symbolically suffocated by her mother’s oppression, as she commits suicide by hanging, Bernarda’s maternal feelings have been suffocated by society. As a widow, she uses her newly found powers to perpetuate those values that benefit men. She becomes their accomplice. Her husband was a womanizer, and she claims that men should enjoy the freedom of the streets. Women should be confined in the house, against their natural instincts.
Bernarda is, at best, an imperfect man, as exemplified in her failed attempt to use the gun —a phallic symbol. BERNARDA: The gun! Where’s the gun? She rushes out. La Poncia runs ahead of her. Amelia enters and looks on frightened, leaning her head against the wall. Behind her comes Martirio. ADELA: No one can hold me back! She tries to go out. […] A shot is heard. BERNARDA, entering: Just try looking for him now! MARTIRIO, entering: That does away with Pepe el Romano. ADELA: Pepe! My God! Pepe! She runs out. PONCIA: Did you kill him?
MARTIRIO: No. He raced away on his mare! BERNARDA: It was my fault. A woman can’t aim (p. 210) Within the play another mother figure, Maria Josefa, vehemently distances herself from Bernarda and approaches Adela, thus leaving Bernarda without support and helpless. She sings a lullaby while holding a “baby” (a lamb) in her arms, an act that Bernarda – devoid of maternal instincts – seems incapable of performing. Bernarda as a mother figure becomes dehumanized and therefore closer to the dimensions of a grotesque caricature.
At the beginning of the play the maid La Poncia threatens Bernarda’s public image with her gossip. At the end of the play, and despite Bernarda’s call for silence, we know that the neighbours have awakened. The thick walls have been rendered useless and the tyrannical figure of Bernarda fall a prey to societal judgement. Bibliography LORCA, Federico Garcia Three Tragedies: Blood Wedding, Yerma, Bernarda Alba. Translated by J. G. Lujan and R. L. O’Connell. New York, New Directions Publishing, 1955.

Categories
Love

What is love?

What is love? Is it something we do or something we can know? Some classify love as something that you feel for some people sometimes. It is often linked or used interchangeably with lust. Others feel that it is something that is constant and untouched by judgment and feeling. The only common denominator for love is that it is something that is desirable; it is something that we want. So what do people want? Many philosophies pose answers; but those answers frequently lead to more questions. Examining Shakespeare’s views on love we see that the poet is happy with his mistress even if she’s not the most beautiful person on the planet.
His view is simple; he has feelings towards her. Love, according to dictionaries, is defined as a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person, and that is what Shakespeare was feeling at the time. People these days want something out of love be it lust, money, land, etc. Shakespeare described love in a multitude of ways in 154 different sonnets. Shakespeare never stated the fact if being blindly is good or bad, he just described the situation and how it felt. What is love? Is it something we do or something we can know?
Some classify love as something that you feel for some people sometimes. It is often linked or used interchangeably with lust. Others feel that it is something that is constant and untouched by judgment and feeling. The only common denominator for love is that it is something that is desirable; it is something that we want. So what do people want? Many philosophies pose answers; but those answers frequently lead to more questions. Examining Shakespeare’s views on love we see that the poet is happy with his mistress even if she’s not the most beautiful person on the planet.

His view is simple; he has feelings towards her. Love, according to dictionaries, is defined as a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person, and that is what Shakespeare was feeling at the time. People these days want something out of love be it lust, money, land, etc. Shakespeare described love in a multitude of ways in 154 different sonnets. Shakespeare never stated the fact if being blindly is good or bad, he just described the situation and how it felt. What is love? Is it something we do or something we can know?
Some classify love as something that you feel for some people sometimes. It is often linked or used interchangeably with lust. Others feel that it is something that is constant and untouched by judgment and feeling. The only common denominator for love is that it is something that is desirable; it is something that we want. So what do people want? Many philosophies pose answers; but those answers frequently lead to more questions. Examining Shakespeare’s views on love we see that the poet is happy with his mistress even if she’s not the most beautiful person on the planet.
His view is simple; he has feelings towards her. Love, according to dictionaries, is defined as a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person, and that is what Shakespeare was feeling at the time. People these days want something out of love be it lust, money, land, etc. Shakespeare described love in a multitude of ways in 154 different sonnets. Shakespeare never stated the fact if being blindly is good or bad, he just described the situation and how it felt. What is love? Is it something we do or something we can know?
Some classify love as something that you feel for some people sometimes. It is often linked or used interchangeably with lust. Others feel that it is something that is constant and untouched by judgment and feeling. The only common denominator for love is that it is something that is desirable; it is something that we want. So what do people want? Many philosophies pose answers; but those answers frequently lead to more questions. Examining Shakespeare’s views on love we see that the poet is happy with his mistress even if she’s not the most beautiful person on the planet.
His view is simple; he has feelings towards her. Love, according to dictionaries, is defined as a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person, and that is what Shakespeare was feeling at the time. People these days want something out of love be it lust, money, land, etc. Shakespeare described love in a multitude of ways in 154 different sonnets. Shakespeare never stated the fact if being blindly is good or bad, he just described the situation and how it felt. What is love? Is it something we do or something we can know?
Some classify love as something that you feel for some people sometimes. It is often linked or used interchangeably with lust. Others feel that it is something that is constant and untouched by judgment and feeling. The only common denominator for love is that it is something that is desirable; it is something that we want. So what do people want? Many philosophies pose answers; but those answers frequently lead to more questions. Examining Shakespeare’s views on love we see that the poet is happy with his mistress even if she’s not the most beautiful person on the planet.
His view is simple; he has feelings towards her. Love, according to dictionaries, is defined as a feeling of strong or constant affection for a person, and that is what Shakespeare was feeling at the time. People these days want something out of love be it lust, money, land, etc. Shakespeare described love in a multitude of ways in 154 different sonnets. Shakespeare never stated the fact if being blindly is good or bad, he just described the situation and how it felt.